Bushel Basket Market: July 31st, 2013

Do you live alone or with one other person? Maybe you’re an empty nester or a new couple, just starting out.  Are you wondering – what do I make with all of the summer produce from the farmers market without wasting anything?  Weekly menus that utilize several ingredients in multiple ways will make sure you get all your vegetables, without sacrificing variety.  This week, take a look at our menu plan for making the most of the August produce:

 

Summer Ratatouille

This French classic is sure to please and uses a lot of summer vegetables in the process! 
Save the leftovers from a one or two person meal, and make one of the variations listed in the newsletter below.

 

Directions

  1. Over medium-low heat, add the oil to a large skillet with the onion, garlic, and bay leaf, stirring occasionally, until the onion has softened.
  2. Add the eggplant and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes or until the eggplant has softened. Stir in the zucchini, red bell pepper, tomatoes, and salt, and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 7 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Stir in the basil and few grinds of pepper to taste.

 

Nutritional Information
Per Serving:  Calories 151, Calcium 41mg, Carbohydrate 14g, Cholesterol 0mg, Fat 11g, Fiber 5g, Iron 1mg, Protein 3mg, Sat Fat 1g, Sodium 586mg

All recipes found at RealSimple.com

Check Out the Other Recipes for One or Two in the Newsletter Below!

 
We are happy to accept two new programs at the Bushel Basket:
Prescription for Health (starting July 16th), and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (also known as Bridge Cards)

For more information on Prescription for Health: Visit Faith in Action and the Prescription for Health websites!  We’ll have healthy market recipes available to inspire you as you fulfill your Prescription for Health goals.You can also visit the market information table for specifics on the programs!Cooking for One or Two

 Use Ingredients for Multiple Meals  

Use the leftover ratatouille from the first recipe to make the following plant-based meals this week, including an Italian Ziti and a Goat Cheese Tart.  One of the hardest parts of getting dinner on the table is figuring out what exactly that dinner is going to be. This system for a week of easy dinners follows that lead. There’s a regular schedule. You’ll never have to comb through cookbooks looking for dinner ideas, because you’ll be using the same basic starter recipe each day. But this system offers variations on those recipes, which means you’ll be eating a different meal every night of the month.

Below are some other meal planning ideas using one base recipe and three variations.  Most of the vegetables can be found at the farmers market!

Vegetarian Ziti Gratin 

 

Ingredients

 

Preperation

  1. Over medium-low heat, add the oil to a large skillet with the onion, garlic, and bay leaf, stirring occasionally, until the onion has softened.
  2. Add the eggplant and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes or until the eggplant has softened. Stir in the zucchini, red bell pepper, tomatoes, and 1 teaspoon of the salt, and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 7 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Stir in basil and a few grinds of fresh pepper to taste.
  3. Cook the ziti according to label directions. Drain and then toss with ricotta cheese, eggs, olive oil, Parmesan, and the remaining teaspoon of salt.
  4. Spoon half the ziti into a lightly greased 4-quart casserole. Top with the ratatouille and then the remaining ziti. Sprinkle with Cheddar. Cover and bake in a preheated 350° F oven for 20 minutes. Uncover and cook 10 minutes more.

 

Vegetable Goat Cheese Tart 

Ingredients

Preperation
  1. Over medium-low heat, add the oil to a large skillet with the onion, garlic, and bay leaf, stirring occasionally, until the onion has softened.
  2. Add the eggplant and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes or until the eggplant has softened. Stir in the zucchini, red bell pepper, tomatoes, and salt, and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 7 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Stir in the basil and season to taste with several grinds of fresh black pepper
  3. Spread the goat cheese in the bottom of the piecrust. Top with the vegetables, sprinkle with Parmesan, and drizzle with olive oil. Bake in a 350° F preheated oven for 20 minutes or until the Parmesan is golden and the tart is heated through.

Here’s several other recipes that use the same multiple recipe system.  Prepare one big dish at the beginning of the week, or prep all the vegetables, so that meal prep goes quicker the next few days:

More Tips from the Mayo Clinic on Eating Healthy for One or Two:

  • Make a plan. Take time to jot down the week’s menu and a shopping list. You’ll find it makes your grocery shopping easier and ensures that you have everything you need when you’re ready to cook.
  • Stock your pantry. Keep canned vegetables, beans and fruits on hand for quick and healthy additions to meals. Rinse canned vegetables and beans under cold running water to lower their salt content. Consider whole grains, such as quinoa, barley, and pastas. Dried foods are easily portioned for one.
  • Take advantage of your freezer. Buy in bulk and freeze in smaller quantities that you can thaw and cook for one or two meals. You may be surprised to learn that you can also freeze foods, including breads, meats, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and nuts and seeds. Freezing keeps food fresh longer and helps prevent waste. For the best quality, freeze food while it’s fresh.
  • Cook a batch and freeze single portions. For example, make a casserole or stew and freeze individual-size servings. Then take out only the amount of food you need. Be sure to write the date and contents on packages and move older packages forward as you add food to your freezer.
  • Prepare one-dish meals. For quick and simple cooking, choose a dish that serves as the whole meal. Look for dishes that include items from several food groups, such as meats, whole grains, legumes and vegetables. Healthy examples include beef, barley and vegetable stew; chicken, vegetable and rice casserole; turkey and bean casserole; and vegetarian chili.
  • Use extras wisely. Plan meals so that you can use the extra food in new dishes. For example, cook rice as a side dish for one meal, then use the remainder in a casserole or rice pudding. Bake chicken for a meal and use the leftovers in sandwiches or soup, or toss with greens, dried fruit and nuts for a tasty salad. Or make a meatloaf mixture and bake some as a meatloaf and freeze the uncooked portion to use later in stuffed peppers.


 Basic Recipe

Variations

Basic Recipe 

Variations

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New Vendor Offerings this Week:
Seasonal Vendors

Ingredient for In-Season Recipe

Kapnick Orchards: Tart cherries,  raspberries, peaches, blueberries, apricots, baking apples, fudge and baked sweet rolls
Duane Bordine of Bordine’s Farm: Bouquets of cut snapdragons, zinnias and pin cushions plus stems of gladiolas.  NEW!
Sprouted Alive Bakery: whole grain, raisin, sprouted and gluten-free bread.
Kapp Farms: baked goods, pretzels and rolls, hot and olive twists, crispy treats, cinnamon rolls, zucchini*, string beans, basil, cherry tomatoes, and kale..
Lutchka Angus and Farm Market: sweet and cooking onions*, herbs, kale, zucchini*, summer squash*, jalapenos, red and yellow potatoes, hot and sweet peppers*,cabbage, cucumbers, corn, eggplant*, zinnias, sunflowers and dillweed..
Kniffen Famly Farms: eggs, whole and half chickens. NEW!

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*Photo courtesy of Lisa Allmendinger at Chelsea Update

Oak Hill Farm: honey, bee pollen, lotion bars, candles, gift bags with assorted honey products.
Mark’s Farms and Greenhouse: maple syrup, kale, chard, beets, kohlrabi, green and sweet onions*, broccoli, cabbage, zucchini*, summer squash*, salad and slicing cukes, green and yellow beans, new, red, Yukon, gold and white potatoes.
Golden Fleece Farm, LLC: Grass fed beef products including ground beef, ground round, rib steaks, T-bone steaks, sirloin steaks, hamburger patties, beef brats, Italian sweet sausage, soup bones, grass fed chickens raised on organic corn, soy-free feed (no GMO) at 3.5-4.5 pounds at $5 per pound.
Greystone Creamery: feta, possibly ricotta, Man-chel cheese, possibly cow Gouda, Chelsea-cam, Rosy-cam, blue Man-chel, sheep Gouda, butternut, garlic pepper and plain cream cheese.
Pregitzer Farm Market, LLC: CSA pick-up, annuals in baskets, broccoli, summer squash*, zucchini*, kale, maybe sweet corn, herbs*.
Janet’s LLC: grilling rubs, jam, flavored nuts, suckers, cajun butter, spices to make flavored butter, U-M and MSU “dammit dolls,” and greeting cards.
T. J Farms: Tomatoes*, zucchini*, onions, perennials, nursery stock plants, trees and bushes.
Mama Mo: hummus and seitan. Hummus flavors include ginger squash, tan/cran orange, sesame chive satay, kalamata rosemary, black pepper walnut, roasted pepper, horseradish, roasted garlic, traditional, lemon zest, curry lime, tomato basil, onion dill, roasted beet, wasabi, jalapeno, chipotle. Seitan flavors include: nuggets, traditional, fajita strips, Italian fennel sausage, breakfast sage sausage, vegan BBQ, BBQ, roast.
Stone Hearth Breads and Bakery: pumpernickel, German rye and German rye seeded, Italian Milano, honey whole wheat, San Francisco sourdough, assorted cookies and buns, four-cheese pepperoni rolls, spinach feta cheese bread, multi-grain bread, country loaf, cheese bread, rosemary herb and tomato basil bread, four-cheese bread sticks, jalapeno cheese bread and assorted sweet breads — including cinnamon, cinnamon raisin, strawberry white chocolate, peach pecan, wild blueberry cream cheese, Reuben rolls, and bacon cheddar beer bread.
Good Times Kettle Corn: kettle corn in small and large bags.

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For all the best in-season, summertime foods and recipes, stay tuned for the weekly installments of the

Bushel Basket Newsletter