May 21st Bushel Basket Market Newsletter

Where
Chelsea Community Hospital, by U of M Family Medicine Center – see map:


When
Wednesday, 2:30 – 6:00 pm
Events
Move More at the Market Events– Sign up for the Chelsea Community Hospital Healthy Communities Walking Program and receive market bags, walking maps and join a walking groups that meet at the market evert week at 4:00 pm and 5:00 pm.

Market Bag Giveaway Day! Fill out a survey and get entered at the market information table. Please come to the market information table get your name in the drawing, and buy a t-shirt ($30) or bag ($20)!

 

2014 brings back your favorite vendors … and more!
We hope you’ll be back to join us too!

 

 

 

THE BUSHEL BASKET FARMERS MARKET IS THE PLACE TO BE!

 

Watch for our weekly emails. We’ll tell you what’s up at the Market.
*****
Forward this email your friends!
Tell them to sign up with [email protected]
*****
The Market is looking for VOLUNTEERS.
Contact [email protected]

What’s in season in Michigan:
Asparagus
Greens
Spring Onions
Plant Starters
Hoop house spring greens
Flower baskets

Seasonal Vendors:

Golden Fleece Farms – We are now selling lamb and pork by the cut
Marks Farms and Greenhouse – Seasonal produce and plant starters, maple syrup
Guthrie Gardens – Perennials, flowering shrubs and small trees
Kelly Farms – Maple syrup
Family Circle Centennial Farms – Honey, sesonal vegetables (spring greens,
Good Times Kettlecorn – Start in June – Fresh kettlecorn!
Pregitzer Farm Market – Seasonal vegetables and plant starters
Lutchka Angus & Farm Market – Seasonal vegetables (Onions, eggs, asparagus,rhubarb), flowers
Bunch O’ Pines/Devulder’s Farm – Seasonal vegetables and fall raspberries.  Devulders Farms will have strawberries this week!
Janet’s LLC – Chocolate treats, trail mixes, jams, and other sweet and salty snacks
Stonehearth Breads – Crusty, artisan breads made from scratch without preservatives, including herb, cheese and fruit flavors
Bordine Farms – Cut flowers, including gladiolas, pin cushions and dahlias (starting in June)
Kapnick Orchards – Apples (from last year’s bountiful crop), Asparagus, Strawberries (coming soon) and sweetbreads, jams and cider.
Mama Mofoods – Hummus and seitan.
Greystone Creamery – Feta, possibly ricotta, Man-chel cheese, possibly cow gouda, Chelsea-cam, blue Man-chel, sheep gouda, butternut, garlic pepper and plain cream cheese.
2nd Hand Fancy – Framed art, jewelry, garden art (May 28th, monthly after)
Flying Dragon Arts – Bead and ribbon jewelry (May 21st, monthly after)
Lutz Orchards (Sept. and Oct.) – Vintage apple varieties
Needle-Lane Farms (May) – Early season greens, onions.

 

Vegetable Egg Salad

Crunchy carrot, cucumber and scallions are a colorful addition to this vegetarian egg salad recipe. Pack it with some crunchy crackers and tomatoes for a healthy, light lunch.

Yield: 4 servings
Ingredients

3 tablespoons nonfat plain yogurt
3 tablespoons reduced-fat mayonnaise
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
8 hard-boiled eggs
1/2 cup finely chopped carrot
1/2 cup chopped cucumber, peeled and seeded if desired
1/4 cup sliced scallions
Preparation

Combine yogurt, mayonnaise, pepper and salt in a medium bowl.
Halve eggs and discard 4 of the yolks (or save for another use). Add whites and the remaining 4 yolks to the bowl and mash to desired consistency. Gently stir in carrot, cucumber and scallions.
More Info: http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/veggie_egg_salad.html

Have the best eggs in your basket!

Shopping for Eggs
Stick with organic Organic standards help lower risk of contaminated feed and organic eggs usually have higher nutrient quality. However, remember that organic by itself does not guarantee a natural lifestyle for the egg-laying chickens.
Ask for pasture-raised Go beyond organic by asking for pasture-raised. Don’t get sidetracked by the confusing array of labeling terms. You are likely to find phrases like “pasture-raised,” “pastured,” “free-range” and “cage-free” on egg packaging, but labeling laws allow products to display these terms even if the egg-laying chickens spend little or no time outdoors in a pasture setting. Talk to your grocer or the chicken producer and find out how the chickens were actually raised.
Consider local farms Organic, pasture-raised eggs may be available from local farms with small flocks and a natural lifestyle for their chickens. Two websites that can help you find small local farms in your area are www.localharvest.org and www.eatwild.com. Both sites are searchable by zip code.